Document

Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)
Registration Nos. 333-252073 and 333-249558
PROSPECTUS SUPPLEMENT NOS. 8 AND 7
(to Prospectuses dated June 25, 2021 and June 25, 2021)

https://cdn.kscope.io/d0606ea176a9940f393014853a231f65-cloverhealtha.jpg
Clover Health Investments, Corp.
________________________________
This prospectus supplement updates and supplements the prospectuses dated June 25, 2021 and June 25, 2021 (the "Prospectuses"), which form a part of our registration statements on Form S-1 (No. 333-252073 and 333-249558, respectively) (the “Registration Statements”). This prospectus supplement is being filed to update and supplement the information in the Prospectuses with the information contained in our current report on Form 10-Q, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 9, 2021 (the “Report”). Accordingly, we have attached the Report to this prospectus supplement.
Our Class A common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “CLOV.” On November 8, 2021, the last reported sales price of our Class A common stock was $8.03 per share.
This prospectus supplement should be read in conjunction with the Prospectuses. This prospectus supplement updates and supplements the information in the Prospectuses. If there is any inconsistency between the information in either of the Prospectuses and this prospectus supplement, you should rely on the information in this prospectus supplement.
This prospectus supplement is not complete without, and may not be delivered or utilized except in connection with, the Prospectuses.
We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and, as such, have elected to comply with certain reduced disclosure and regulatory requirements.
________________________________
Investing in our securities involves risks. See the section entitled “Risk Factors” in each of the Prospectuses, and under similar headings in any further amendments or supplements to the Prospectuses, to read about factors you should consider before buying our securities.
________________________________
Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus supplement or the Prospectuses is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
The date of this prospectus supplement is November 9, 2021.






UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549
________________________________________
FORM 10-Q
________________________________________
(Mark One)
xQUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021
OR
oTRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ________ to ________
Commission File Number: 001-39252
________________________________________
Clover Health Investments, Corp.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)
________________________________________
Delaware98-1515192
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
3401 Mallory Lane, Suite 210
Franklin, Tennessee
37067
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (201) 432-2133

725 Cool Springs Boulevard, Suite 320
Franklin, Tennessee
37067
(Former address of executive offices)(Zip Code)
________________________________________
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Trading
Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per shareCLOVThe NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes  x    No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).     Yes  x    No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated fileroAccelerated filero
Non-accelerated filer
x
Smaller reporting companyo
Emerging growth company
x
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes  o    No  x
As of November 2, 2021, the registrant had 278,308,964 shares of Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share, and 142,283,462 shares of Class B Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.
1


Table of Contents
Page






As used in this report, “Corporation,” “Company,” “Clover Health,” “we,” “us,” “our” and similar terms refer to Clover Health Investments, Corp. and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless otherwise noted or the context otherwise requires.

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This document contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements contained in this document other than statements of historical fact, including statements regarding our future results of operations, financial position, market size and opportunity, our business strategy and plans, the factors affecting our performance and our objectives for future operations, are forward-looking statements. The words “believe,” “may,” “will,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “can,” “expect,” “project,” “outlook,” “forecast,” “objective,” “plan,” “potential,” “seek,” “grow,” “target,” “if,” and the negative or plural of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy, short-term and long-term business operations and objectives and financial needs. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including those described in the section titled “Risk Factors” in this document and the risk factors described in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time. It is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the future events and trends discussed in this document may not occur, and actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements contained in this document involve a number of judgments, risks and uncertainties, including, without limitation, risks related to:

our expectations regarding results of operations, financial condition and cash flows;
our expectations regarding the development and expansion of our Medicare Advantage and Direct Contracting businesses;
our ability to successfully enter new service markets and manage our operations;
anticipated trends and challenges in our business and in the markets in which we operate;
our ability to expand our beneficiary base and provider network;
our ability to increase adoption and use of the Clover Assistant;
the anticipated benefits associated with the use of the Clover Assistant platform, including our ability to utilize the platform to manage our medical care ratios;
our ability to develop new features and functionality that meet market needs and achieve market acceptance;
our ability to retain and hire necessary employees and staff our operations appropriately;
the timing and amount of certain investments in growth;
the effect of uncertainties related to the global COVID-19 pandemic on our business, results of operations, and financial condition;
the outcome of any known and unknown litigation and regulatory proceedings;
any current, pending or future legislation, regulations or policies that could have a negative effect on our revenue and businesses, including rules, regulations and policies relating to healthcare and Medicare;
our ability to maintain or improve our Star Ratings or otherwise continue to improve the financial performance of our business;
our ability to maintain, protect and enhance our intellectual property; and
general economic conditions, including the societal and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and geopolitical uncertainty and instability.

We caution you that the foregoing list of judgments, risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements may not be complete. You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. The events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements may not be achieved or occur. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Except as required by law, we do not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements after the date of this document or to conform these statements to actual results or revised expectations.

You should read this document with the understanding that our actual future results, levels of activity, performance and events and circumstances may be materially different from what we expect. This document contains estimates, projections and other information concerning our industry, our business and the markets for our products. We obtained the industry, market and similar data set forth in this document from our own internal estimates and research and from industry research, publications, surveys and studies conducted by third parties, including governmental agencies. Information that is based on estimates, forecasts, projections, market research or similar methodologies is inherently subject to uncertainties, and actual events or circumstances may differ materially from events and circumstances that are assumed in this information. While we believe that the data we use are reliable, we have not separately verified these data. You are cautioned not to give undue weight to any such information, projections and estimates.




As a result of a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties, including without limitation, the important factors described in the “Risk Factors” section in this document, our actual results or performance may be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

Additional Information

Our website address is www.cloverhealth.com. We use the investor relations page of our website for purposes of compliance with Regulation FD and as a routine channel for distribution of important information, including news releases, analyst presentations, financial information and corporate governance practices. Our filings with the SEC are posted on our website and available free of charge as soon as reasonably practical after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. The SEC’s website, www.sec.gov, contains reports, proxy statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The content on any website referred to in this document is not incorporated by reference in this document unless expressly noted. Further, the Company’s references to website URLs are intended to be inactive textual references only.

Channels for Disclosure of Information

Investors and others should note that we routinely announce material information to investors and the marketplace using filings with the SEC, press releases, public conference calls, presentations, webcasts and our investor relations website. We also intend to use certain social media channels as a means of disclosing information about the Company and our products to our customers, investors and the public, including @Clover_Health and #CloverHealth on Twitter, and the LinkedIn account of our President and Chief Technology Officer, Andrew Toy. The information posted on social media channels is not incorporated by reference in this report or in any other report or document we file with the SEC. While not all of the information that we post to our investor relations website or to social media accounts is of a material nature, some information could be deemed to be material. Accordingly, we encourage investors, the media, and others interested in the Company to review the information that we share at the “Investors” link located at the bottom of our webpage at https://investors.cloverhealth.com/investor-relations and to sign up for and regularly follow our social media accounts. Users may automatically receive email alerts and other information about the Company when enrolling an email address by visiting “Email Alerts” in the “Investor Resources” section of our website at https://investors.cloverhealth.com/investor-relations.



PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements.
CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Dollars in thousands, except share amounts)


September 30, 2021 (Unaudited)
December 31, 2020
Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents$202,264 $92,348 
Short-term investments218,390 4,098 
Investment securities, available-for sale (Amortized cost: 2021: $21,139; 2020: $0)
21,142 — 
Investment securities, held-to-maturity (Fair value: 2021: $308; 2020: $266)
305 265 
Accrued retrospective premiums30,184 34,829 
Other receivables21,127 11,368 
Healthcare receivable34,656 38,745 
Surety bonds and deposits13,165 — 
Prepaid expenses12,177 7,830 
Other assets, current5,871 299 
Total current assets559,281 189,782 
Direct Contracting performance year receivable220,738 — 
Investment securities, available-for sale (Amortized cost: 2021: $146,796; 2020: $53,953)
146,183 53,963 
Investment securities, held-to-maturity (Fair value: 2021: $419; 2020: $471)
390 429 
Property and equipment, net2,172 2,078 
Operating lease right-of-use assets5,828 7,882 
Goodwill and other intangible assets4,233 4,233 
Other assets, non-current13,653 8,885 
Total assets$952,478 $267,252 


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements




1


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Dollars in thousands, except share amounts)


September 30, 2021 (Unaudited)
December 31, 2020
Liabilities, Convertible Preferred Stock and Stockholders' Equity
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Unpaid claims$140,210 $103,976 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses24,208 30,671 
Accrued salaries and benefits13,436 3,978 
Operating lease liabilities3,729 4,795 
Current portion of notes and securities payable— 20,803 
Premium deficiency reserve48,661 — 
Other liabilities, current
Total current liabilities230,249 164,228 
Direct Contracting performance year obligation244,599 — 
Notes and securities payable, net of discounts and deferred issuance costs19,929 106,413 
Derivative liabilities— 44,810 
Warrants payable— 97,782 
Long-term operating lease liabilities4,818 6,349 
Other liabilities, non-current40,593 13,116 
Total liabilities540,188 432,698 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 18)
Convertible Preferred stock (Series Seed A, A-1, B, C, and D), $0.0001 par value; 0 and 155,387,025 shares authorized as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively; 0 and 139,444,346 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively; aggregate liquidation preference of $0 and $470,256 as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively (1)
— 447,747 
Stockholders' equity
Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 par value; 2,500,000,000 and 0 shares authorized as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively; 278,308,964 and 0 issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively
28 — 
Class B Common Stock, $0.0001 par value; 500,000,000 and 351,572,668 shares authorized; 142,318,711 and 89,206,266 issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively (1)
14 
Additional paid-in capital1,838,639 411,867 
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income(610)10 
Accumulated deficit(1,429,537)(1,028,982)
Less: Treasury stock, at cost; 14,730 and 0 shares held as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively
(147)— 
Clover stockholders’ equity (deficit)408,387 (617,096)
Noncontrolling interest3,903 3,903 
Total stockholders' equity (deficit)412,290 (613,193)
Total liabilities, convertible preferred stock and stockholders' equity$952,478 $267,252 
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information.



2


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except per share and share amounts)


Three Months Ended
September 30,
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
2021202020212020
Revenues:
Premiums earned, net (Net of ceded premiums of $120 and $126 for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively; net of ceded premiums of $370 and $383 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively)
$203,657 $167,075 $598,390 $501,100 
Direct Contracting revenue222,647 — 439,020 — 
Other income859 1,994 2,550 5,555 
Total revenues427,163 169,069 1,039,960 506,655 
Operating expenses:
Net medical claims incurred436,422 144,846 1,109,375 410,540 
Salaries and benefits73,364 16,628 201,555 57,339 
General and administrative expenses45,749 29,847 129,983 79,798 
Premium deficiency reserve expense (benefit)20,761 (772)48,661 (16,357)
Depreciation and amortization120 138 398 413 
Other expense— — 191 — 
Total operating expenses576,416 190,687 1,490,163 531,733 
Loss from operations(149,253)(21,618)(450,203)(25,078)
Change in fair value of warrants payable(115,152)20,029 (66,146)31,903 
Interest expense413 9,268 2,817 25,560 
Amortization of notes and securities discounts13 4,408 13,681 14,935 
Gain on derivative— (68,081)— (87,475)
Net (loss) income$(34,527)$12,758 $(400,555)$(10,001)
Per share data:
Net (loss) income per share attributable to common stockholders – basic (1)
$(0.08)$0.06 $(0.98)$(0.11)
Net (loss) income per share attributable to common stockholders – diluted (1)
(0.08)0.02 (0.98)(0.11)
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding
Basic weighted average number of common shares and common share equivalents outstanding (1)
414,572,706 88,863,244 410,417,493 88,616,116 
Diluted weighted average number of common shares and common share equivalents outstanding (1)
414,572,706 248,133,335 410,417,493 88,616,116 
Unrealized (loss) gain on available-for-sale investments$(197)$(611)$(620)$718 
Comprehensive (loss) income$(34,724)$12,147 $(401,175)$(9,283)
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information. Because the Corporation had a net loss during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, and a net loss during the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Corporation’s potentially dilutive securities, which include stock options, restricted stock, preferred stock and warrants to purchase shares of common stock and preferred stock, have been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share, as the effect would be anti-dilutive.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
3


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT) (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except share amounts)
Convertible Preferred stockClass A Common StockClass B Common StockAdditional paid-in capitalAccumulated
deficit
Treasury StockAccumulated
other
comprehensive
income (loss)
Noncontrolling
interest
Total stockholders' equity (deficit)
Shares (1)
AmountSharesAmount
Shares (1)
Amount
Balance, June 30, 2020
139,444,346 $447,747 — $— 88,786,712 $$407,115 $(914,392)$— $1,375 $3,903 $(501,990)
Stock issuance for exercise of stock options, net of early exercise liability— — — — 240,998 — 329 — — — — 329 
Stock-based compensation— — — — — — 1,500 — — — — 1,500 
Unrealized holdings loss on investment securities, available-for-sale— — — — — — — — — (611)— (611)
Net income— — — — — — — 12,758 — — — 12,758 
Balance, September 30, 2020
139,444,346 $447,747 — $— 89,027,710 $$408,944 $(901,634)$— $764 $3,903 $(488,014)
Balance, June 30, 2021
— — 148,560,977 $15 259,744,474 $26 $1,706,334 $(1,395,010)— $(413)$3,903 $314,855 
Stock issuance for exercise of stock options, net of early exercise liability— — 2,893,802 — — — 3,830 — — — — 3,830 
Stock-based compensation— — — — — — 46,803 — — — — 46,803 
Vested restricted stock units— — 20,158 — — — — — — — — — 
Unrealized holdings gain on investment securities, available-for-sale— — — — — — — — — (197)— (197)
Conversion from Class B Common Stock to Class A Common Stock— — 117,425,763 12 (117,425,763)(12)— — — — — — 
Issuance of common stock related to exercises of Public and Private Placement Warrants— — 9,408,264 — — 81,672 — — — — 81,673 
Treasury stock acquired— — — — — — — — (147)— — (147)
Net loss— — — — — — — (34,527)— — — (34,527)
Balance, September 30, 2021
— $— 278,308,964 $28 142,318,711 $14 $1,838,639 $(1,429,537)$(147)$(610)$3,903 $412,290 
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for details.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
4


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED STOCK AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT) (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except share amounts)
Convertible Preferred stockClass A Common StockClass B Common StockAdditional paid-in capitalAccumulated
deficit
Treasury StockAccumulated
other
comprehensive
income (loss)
Noncontrolling
interest
Total stockholders' equity (deficit)
Shares (1)
AmountSharesAmount
Shares (1)
Amount
Balance, December 31, 2019
139,444,346 $447,747 — $— 88,279,119 $$403,041 $(891,633)$— $46 $— $(488,537)
Stock issuance for exercise of stock options, net of early exercise liability— — — — 748,591 — 954 — — — — 954 
Stock-based compensation— — — — — — 4,949 — — — — 4,949 
Unrealized holdings gain on investment securities, available-for-sale— — — — — — — — — 718 — 718 
Interests issued— — — — — — — — — — 3,903 3,903 
Net loss— — — — — — — (10,001)— — — (10,001)
Balance, September 30, 2020
139,444,346 $447,747 — $— 89,027,710 $$408,944 $(901,634)$— $764 $3,903 $(488,014)
Balance, December 31, 2020
139,444,346 $447,747 — $— 89,206,266 $$411,867 $(1,028,982)— $10 $3,903 $(613,193)
Stock issuance for exercise of stock options, net of early exercise liability— — 3,859,648 — — — 5,547 — — — — 5,547 
Stock-based compensation— — — — — — 132,542 — — — — 132,542 
Vested restricted stock units— — 20,158 — — — — — — — — — 
Unrealized holdings loss on investment securities, available-for-sale— — — — — — — — — (620)— (620)
Preferred stock conversion(139,444,346)(447,747)— — 139,444,346 14 447,733 — — — — 447,747 
Issuance of common stock related to exercises of legacy warrants— — — — 7,205,490 97,781 — — — 97,782 
Convertible debt conversion and other issuances— — — — 75,084,703 16,052 — — — — 16,059 
Issuance of common stock in connection with Business Combination and PIPE offering— — 146,373,904 15 (49,975,104)(5)666,232 — — — — 666,242 
Conversion from Class B Common Stock to Class A Common Stock— — 118,646,990 12 (118,646,990)(12)— — — — — — 
Capital contribution for extinguishment of debt— — — — — — 126,795 — — — — 126,795 
Acquisition of Public and Private Placement Warrants— — — — — — (147,582)— — — — (147,582)
Issuance of common stock related to exercises of Public and Private Placement Warrants— — 9,408,264 — — 81,672 — — — — 81,673 
Treasury stock acquired— — — — — — — — (147)— — (147)
Net loss— — — — — — — (400,555)— — — (400,555)
Balance, September 30, 2021
— $— 278,308,964 $28 142,318,711 $14 $1,838,639 $(1,429,537)$(147)$(610)$3,903 $412,290 
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for details.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
5


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands)
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
20212020
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net loss$(400,555)$(10,001)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization expense398 413 
Amortization of notes and securities discounts and debt issuance costs13,681 14,935 
Stock-based compensation expense132,542 4,949 
Paid-in-kind interest— 18,769 
Change in fair value of warrants payable and amortization of warrants(66,146)31,903 
Change in derivative liabilities— (87,475)
Accretion, net of amortization142 (307)
Net realized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities52 (421)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Accrued retrospective premiums4,645 (14,653)
Other receivables(9,759)(9,838)
Reinsurance recoverable— 376 
Performance year receivable(220,738)— 
Surety bonds and deposits(13,165)— 
Prepaid expenses(4,347)(6,296)
Other assets(10,261)496 
Healthcare receivables4,089 (8,506)
Operating lease right-of-use assets2,636 2,437 
Unpaid claims36,234 15,729 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses1,386 5,937 
Accrued salaries and benefits9,458 662 
Premium deficiency reserve48,661 (16,356)
Other liabilities27,477 1,414 
Performance year obligation244,599 — 
Operating lease liabilities(3,179)(2,761)
Net cash used in operating activities(202,150)(58,594)
Cash flows from investing activities:
Purchases of short-term investments and available-for-sale securities(705,598)(152,248)
Proceeds from sales of short-term investments and available-for-sale securities126,862 166,024 
Proceeds from maturities of short-term investments and available-for-sale securities250,265 56,701 
Purchases of property and equipment(485)(630)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities(328,956)69,847 
Cash flows from financing activities:
Proceeds from issuance of convertible notes— 20,000 
Deferred financing costs— (108)
Payment of notes payable principal(30,925)(13,868)
Issuance of common stock, net of early exercise liability5,547 954 
Proceeds from reverse recapitalization, net of transaction costs666,242 — 
Proceeds received for the exercise of Public and Private Warrants390 — 
Payment for the redemptions of Public Warrants(85)— 
Treasury stock acquired(147)— 
Acquisition of noncontrolling interest— 3,903 
Net cash provided by financing activities641,022 10,881 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents109,916 22,134 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period92,348 67,598 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period$202,264 $89,732 
Supplemental cash flow disclosures
Cash paid during the period for interest$— $3,524 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities
Conversion of preferred stock to common stock$447,747 $— 
Issuance of common stock related to convertible debt16,059 — 
Capital contribution for extinguishment of debt126,795 — 
Issuance of common stock related to warrants exercised97,782 — 
Acquisition of Public and Private Warrants147,582 — 
Issuance of common stock related to the exercise of Public and Private Warrants81,283 — 
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease liabilities582 — 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
6


CLOVER HEALTH INVESTMENTS, CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
1. Organization and Operations
Clover Health Investments, Corp. (collectively with its affiliates and subsidiaries, "Clover" or the "Corporation") is singularly focused on creating great, sustainable healthcare to improve every life. Clover has centered its strategy on building and deploying technology through its flagship software platform, the Clover Assistant, to help America’s seniors receive better care at lower costs.
Clover provides affordable, high-quality Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, including Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) and Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) plans, through its regulated insurance subsidiaries. The Corporation's regulated insurance subsidiaries consist of Clover Insurance Company and Clover HMO of New Jersey Inc., which operate the Corporation's PPO and HMO health plans, respectively. On April 1, 2021, the Corporation's subsidiary Clover Health Partners, LLC, began participating as a Direct Contracting Entity (DCE) in the Global and Professional Direct Contracting Model (DC Model) of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. Medical Service Professionals of NJ, LLC, houses Clover's employed physicians and the related support staff for Clover's in-home care program. Clover's administrative functions and insurance operations are primarily operated by its Clover Health, LLC and Clover Health Labs, LLC subsidiaries.
Clover's approach is to combine technology, data analytics, and preventive care to lower costs and increase the quality of health and life of Medicare beneficiaries. Clover's technology platform uses machine learning-powered systems to deliver data and insights to physicians at the point of care in order to improve outcomes for beneficiaries and drive down costs. Clover's MA plans generally provide access to a wide network of primary care providers, specialists, and hospitals, enabling its members to see any doctor participating in Medicare willing to accept them. Clover focuses on minimizing members' out-of-pocket costs and offers many plans that allow members to pay the same co-pays for primary care provider visits regardless of whether their physician is in- or out-of-network. Clover's DCE, which assumes full risk (i.e., 100.0% shared savings and shared losses) for the total cost of care of aligned Original Medicare beneficiaries (DCE Beneficiaries), focuses on its technology platform to enhance healthcare delivery, reduce expenditures, and improve care for DCE Beneficiaries.
Clover was originally incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company on October 18, 2019, as a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) under the name Social Capital Hedosophia Holdings Corp. III (SCH). On October 5, 2020, SCH entered into a Merger Agreement (the "Merger Agreement") with Clover Health Investments, Inc., a corporation originally incorporated on July 17, 2014, in the state of Delaware (Legacy Clover). Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, and a favorable vote of SCH's stockholders on January 6, 2021, Asclepius Merger Sub Inc., a Delaware corporation and a newly formed, wholly owned subsidiary of SCH (Merger Sub), was merged with and into Legacy Clover. Upon consummation of the business combination, the separate corporate existence of Merger Sub ceased, the Corporation survived and merged with and into SCH, with SCH as the surviving corporation, and SCH was redomesticated as a Delaware corporation and renamed Clover Health Investments, Corp. (the "Business Combination"). The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (GAAP). Under the guidance in Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 805, Legacy Clover is treated as the "acquirer" for financial reporting purposes. Legacy Clover is deemed the accounting predecessor of the combined business, and Clover, as the parent company of the combined business, is the successor SEC registrant, meaning that Legacy Clover's financial statements for previous periods are disclosed in periodic reports filed with the SEC. As a result of the Business Combination, there were simultaneous changes to Legacy Clover's convertible securities, warrants, and convertible preferred stock. See Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable), Note 10 (Warrants Payable), and Note 14 (Convertible Preferred Stock) for additional information regarding these changes. See also Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information related to the Business Combination.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of presentation
The Corporation's interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in conformity with GAAP and include the accounts of the Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiaries. In the opinion of management, the Corporation has made all necessary adjustments, which include normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of its financial position and its results of operations for the interim periods presented. All material intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidating these financial statements. These interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the audited Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 included in Exhibit 99.5 of Amendment No. 1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K (the "Form 8-K/A") filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on April 1, 2021.
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Reclassifications

To conform to the current period presentation, prepaid expenses, which were previously included in other assets, current, are presented as a separate line item in the prior year’s Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. Certain amounts in the prior year period’s Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows have been reclassified to conform to the current year period’s presentation, primarily related to the amortization of warrants, amortization of debt issuance costs, and paid-in-kind interest. These reclassifications had no effect on the previously reported Consolidated Financial Statements.

Use of estimates
The preparation of the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes.
The areas involving the most significant use of estimates are the amounts of incurred but not reported claims. Many factors can cause actual outcomes to deviate from these assumptions and estimates, such as changes in economic conditions, changes in government healthcare policy, advances in medical technology, changes in treatment patterns, and changes in average lifespan. Accordingly, the Corporation cannot determine with precision the ultimate amounts that it will pay for, or the timing of payment of actual claims, or whether the assets supporting the liabilities will grow to the level the Corporation assumes prior to payment of claims. If the Corporation's actual experience is different from its assumptions or estimates, the Corporation's reserves may prove inadequate. As a result, the Corporation would incur a charge to operations in the period in which it determines such a shortfall exists, which could have a material adverse effect on the Corporation's business, results of operations, and financial condition. Other areas involving significant estimates include risk adjustment provisions related to Medicare contracts and the valuation of the Corporation's investment securities, goodwill and other intangible assets, reinsurance, the premium deficiency reserve, warrants, the embedded derivative related to the convertible securities, stock-based compensation, recoveries from third parties for coordination of benefits, the Direct Contracting benchmark specifically cost trend and risk score estimates that can develop over time, and final determination of medical cost adjustment pools.
Performance guarantees

Certain of the Corporation’s arrangements with third-party providers require it to guarantee the performance of its care network to CMS. As a result of the Corporation’s participation in the DC Model, the Corporation determined that it was making a performance guarantee with respect to providers of DCE Beneficiaries that should be recognized in the financial statements. Accordingly, a liability for the performance guarantee was recorded on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. Each month, as the performance guarantee is fulfilled, the guarantee is amortized on a straight-line basis for the amount that represents the completed performance. With respect to each performance year in which the DCE is a participant, the final consideration due to the DCE by CMS (shared savings) or the consideration due to CMS by the DCE (shared loss) is reconciled in the subsequent years following the performance year. The shared savings or loss is measured periodically and will be applied to the Direct Contracting performance obligation if the Corporation is in a probable loss position. Direct Contracting revenue is also known in the DC Model as CMS’s performance year expenditures and is the primary component used to calculate shared savings or shared loss versus the performance year benchmark. Direct Contracting revenue is representative of CMS’s total expenditures incurred for medical services provided on behalf of DCE Beneficiaries during months in which those beneficiaries were alignment-eligible and aligned to the DCE. Direct Contracting revenue is calculated by taking the sum of the capitation payments made to the Corporation for services within the scope of the Corporation’s capitation arrangement and fee-for-service (FFS) payments made to providers directly from CMS.
Capitalized software development costs - cloud computing arrangements
The Corporation's cloud computing arrangements mostly comprise hosting arrangements which are service contracts, whereby the Corporation gains remote access to use enterprise software hosted by the vendor or another third party on an as-needed basis for a period of time in exchange for a subscription fee. Implementation costs for cloud computing arrangements are capitalized if certain criteria are met and consist of internal and external costs directly attributable to developing and configuring cloud computing software for its intended use. These capitalized implementation costs are presented in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets in other assets, and are generally amortized over the fixed, non-cancelable term of the associated hosting arrangement on a straight-line basis.

Deferred acquisition costs
Acquisition costs directly related to the successful acquisition of new business, which is primarily made up of commissions costs, are deferred and subsequently amortized. Deferred acquisition costs are recorded as other assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet and are amortized over the estimated life of the related contracts. The amortization of deferred acquisition costs is recorded in general and administrative expenses in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. As of
8


September 30, 2021, there were no deferred acquisition costs as a result of the acceleration of amortization for deferred acquisition costs due to the recognition of a premium deficiency reserve during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, amortization expense of deferred acquisition costs of $1.1 million and $9.6 million, respectively, were recognized in general and administrative expenses. There was no amortization expense of deferred acquisition costs for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.
COVID-19
The societal and economic impact of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is continuing to evolve, and the ultimate impact on the Corporation’s business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows is uncertain and difficult to predict. The global pandemic has severely impacted businesses worldwide, including many in the health insurance sector. In response to the pandemic, the Corporation has implemented additional steps related to its care delivery, member support, and internal policies and operations.
Recent accounting pronouncements
Recently adopted accounting pronouncements
Emerging Growth Company
The Corporation currently qualifies as an "emerging growth company" under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the "JOBS Act"). Accordingly, the Corporation has the option to adopt new or revised accounting guidance either (i) within the same periods as those otherwise applicable to non-emerging growth companies or (ii) within the same time periods applicable to private companies. The Corporation has elected to adopt new or revised accounting guidance within the same time period as private companies, unless, as indicated below, management determines it is preferable to take advantage of early adoption provisions offered within the applicable guidance.
Fair value measurements
In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the "FASB") issued Accounting Standard Update (ASU) 2018-13, Changes to Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurements, the purpose of which is to improve the effectiveness of disclosure requirements for recurring and nonrecurring fair value measurements. The standard removes, modifies, and adds certain disclosure requirements and is in effect for all entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. This standard became effective for the Corporation on January 1, 2020, and did not have a material impact on the Corporation's disclosures.
Cloud computing arrangements
In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) – Internal Use Software: Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract. This update changes the accounting guidance for cloud computing arrangements. If a cloud computing arrangement includes a license to internal-use software, the software license is accounted for by the customer by recognizing an asset for the software license and, to the extent that the payments attributable to the software license are made over time, recognizing a corresponding liability. If a cloud computing arrangement does not include a software license, the entity should account for the arrangement as a service contract and should expense any fees associated with the hosting element (service) of the arrangement as incurred. ASU 2018-15 is effective for nonpublic entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The Corporation adopted ASU 2018-15 on January 1, 2021, on a prospective basis. The Corporation's cloud computing arrangements relate to the set-up of various platforms, including but not limited to clinical data repositories and other system integrations. The capitalized implementation costs are presented in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet in other assets, current and are amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the underlying cloud computing hosting contract, which is the noncancelable term of the arrangement plus any reasonably certain renewal periods. As of September 30, 2021, $5.0 million was recorded in other assets, current, as deferred implementation costs. For both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, amortization expense associated with the Corporation’s cloud computing arrangements was $0.2 million. No impairment was recognized during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, as there were no events or changes in circumstances to indicate that the carrying amount of the Corporation's cloud computing arrangements may not be recoverable.
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Accounting pronouncements effective in future periods
Credit losses
In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which was subsequently modified by several ASUs issued in 2018 and 2019. This standard introduces a new current expected credit loss (CECL) model for measuring expected credit losses for certain types of financial instruments measured at amortized cost and replaces the incurred loss model. The CECL model requires an entity to recognize an allowance for credit losses for the difference between the amortized cost basis of a financial instrument and the amount the entity expects to collect over the instrument's contractual life after consideration of historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. This standard also introduces targeted changes to the available-for-sale debt securities impairment model. It eliminates the concept of other-than-temporary impairment and requires an entity to determine whether any impairment is the result of a credit loss or other factors. ASU 2016-13 is effective for nonpublic entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, and public entities beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Corporation has evaluated the impact of ASU 2016-13 on the Consolidated Financial Statements and expects the impact to be immaterial.
Goodwill and other intangible assets
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. This update removes Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test under current guidance, which requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation. The new guidance requires an impairment charge to be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit's fair value. Upon adoption, the guidance is to be applied prospectively. ASU 2017-04 is effective for nonpublic entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and public entities beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Corporation is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2017-04 on the Consolidated Financial Statements, but does not expect for this to have a material impact on the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Income taxes
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The amendments in ASU 2019-12 remove certain exceptions to the general principles in ASC Topic 740. The amendments also clarify and amend existing guidance to improve consistent application. The amendments are effective for nonpublic entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and public entities beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. The transition method (retrospective, modified retrospective, or prospective basis) related to the amendments depends on the applicable guidance, and all amendments for which there is no transition guidance specified are to be applied on a prospective basis. The Corporation is currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2019-12 on the Consolidated Financial Statements, but does not expect for this to have a material impact on the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Accounting for convertible instruments and contracts in an entity's own equity
In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity's Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40). The amendments in ASU 2020-06 simplify the accounting for convertible instruments by removing certain separation models for convertible instruments. Under the amendments in ASU 2020-06, the embedded conversion features no longer are separated from the host contract for convertible instruments with conversion features that are not required to be accounted for as derivatives, or that do not result in substantial premiums accounted for as paid-in capital. Consequently, a convertible debt instrument will be accounted for as a single liability measured at its amortized cost, and a convertible preferred stock will be accounted for as a single equity instrument measured at its historical cost, as long as no other features require bifurcation and recognition as derivatives. ASU 2020-06 is effective for nonpublic entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023. Early adoption is permitted, but no earlier than fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and public entities beginning after December 15, 2021. The Corporation is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2020-06 on the Consolidated Financial Statements, but does not expect for this to have a material impact on the Consolidated Financial Statements.

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3. Business Combination
On October 5, 2020, Legacy Clover entered into a Merger Agreement with SCH, a SPAC, and Merger Sub. On January 7, 2021, as contemplated by the Merger Agreement and following approval by SCH's shareholders at an extraordinary general meeting held January 6, 2021 (the "Special Meeting"):
SCH filed a notice of deregistration with the Cayman Islands Registrar of Companies, together with the necessary accompanying documents, and filed a certificate of incorporation and a certificate of corporate domestication with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware, under which SCH was domesticated and continued as a Delaware corporation (the "Domestication"); and
Merger Sub merged with and into Legacy Clover, the separate corporate existence of Merger Sub ceased and Legacy Clover became the surviving corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of SCH (the "First Merger") and Legacy Clover merged with and into SCH, the separate corporate existence of Legacy Clover ceased and SCH became the surviving corporation, changing its name to "Clover Health Investments, Corp." (together with the First Merger, the "Mergers," and collectively with the Domestication, the “Business Combination”).

As a result of the Mergers, among other things, (i) all outstanding shares of common stock of Legacy Clover immediately prior to the effective time of the First Merger were canceled in exchange for the right to receive, at the election of the holders thereof (except with respect to the shares held by entities controlled by Vivek Garipalli and the holders of convertible securities previously issued by Legacy Clover to certain holders who received only shares of Class B Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of Clover (Class B Common Stock), which are entitled to 10 votes per share, an amount in cash, shares of Class B Common Stock, or a combination thereof, as adjusted in accordance with the Merger Agreement, which equaled in the aggregate $499.8 million in cash and 260,965,701 shares of Class B Common Stock (at a deemed value of $10.00 per share); (ii) shares of Legacy Clover held by entities controlled by Vivek Garipalli and the holders of the convertible securities immediately prior to the effective time of the First Merger were canceled in exchange for the right to receive shares of Class B Common Stock based on an Exchange Ratio (as defined in the Merger Agreement) of approximately 2.0681; and (iii) all shares of common stock of Legacy Clover reserved in respect of Legacy Clover stock options and restricted stock units outstanding as of immediately prior to the effective time of the First Merger, were converted, based on the Exchange Ratio, into awards based on shares of Class B Common Stock. The consideration that a Clover stockholder received was subject to pro rata adjustment depending on the election made by such stockholder, if any, in accordance with the terms of the Merger Agreement. The pro rata adjustments were made based on an Actual Cash/Stock Ratio (as defined in the Merger Agreement) of 32.3%.
In connection with the consummation of the Business Combination (the "Closing"), (i) each issued and outstanding Class A ordinary share, par value $0.0001 per share, of SCH (SCH Class A ordinary shares) converted automatically, on a one-for-one basis, into a share of Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, of Clover (the "Class A Common Stock," and together with the Class B Common Stock, the "Common Stock"), which will be entitled to one vote per share, (ii) each of the issued and outstanding Class B ordinary shares, par value $0.0001 per share, of SCH, converted automatically, on a one-for-one basis, into a share of Class A Common Stock, (iii) each issued and outstanding warrant of SCH converted automatically into a warrant to acquire one share of Class A Common Stock (Warrant), pursuant to the Warrant Agreement, dated April 21, 2020, between SCH and Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as warrant agent, and (iv) each issued and outstanding unit of SCH (SCH unit) that had not been previously separated into the underlying Class A ordinary share and underlying warrant of SCH upon the request of the holder thereof, was canceled and the holder thereof is entitled to one share of Class A Common Stock and one-third of one Warrant. As of January 7, 2021, there were public warrants outstanding to purchase an aggregate of 27,599,938 shares of Class A Common Stock (the "Public Warrants") and private placement warrants outstanding to purchase an aggregate of 10,933,333 shares of Class A Common Stock (the "Private Placement Warrants" and, together with the Public Warrants, the “Warrants”). Each whole Warrant entitled the registered holder to purchase one whole share of Class A Common Stock at a price of $11.50 per share, subject to adjustment at any time commencing on April 24, 2021, which is 12 months from the closing of SCH's initial public offering.
Pursuant to the subscription agreements (the "Subscription Agreements") entered into on October 5, 2020, by and among SCH and certain investors (collectively, the "PIPE Investors"), Clover issued and sold to the PIPE Investors (substantially concurrently with the consummation of the Mergers) an aggregate of 40,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock for an aggregate purchase price equal to $400.0 million (the "PIPE Investment"), of which 15,200,000 shares were purchased by affiliates of SCH Sponsor III LLC (the "Sponsor," and collectively, the "Sponsor Related PIPE Investors").

The Business Combination and PIPE Investment were approved by the SCH shareholders at the Special Meeting. Prior to and in connection with the Special Meeting, holders of 24,892 shares of SCH Class A ordinary shares (including those that underlie the SCH units) that were registered pursuant to the Registration Statements on Form S-1 (333-236776 and 333-237777) and the shares of Class A Common Stock issued as a matter of law upon the conversion thereof on the effective date of the Domestication (the "Public
11


Shares") exercised their right to redeem those shares for cash at a price of $10.00 per share, for an aggregate of $0.2 million. The per share redemption price of $10.00 for public shareholders electing redemption was paid out of the SCH Trust Account, which after taking into account the redemptions, had a balance immediately prior to the Closing of $827.9 million, which cash balance was used to pay the $499.8 million cash component of the merger consideration.
Immediately after giving effect to the Business Combination and the PIPE Investment, there were 143,475,108 shares of Class A Common Stock, 260,965,701 shares of Class B Common Stock and 38,533,271 Warrants outstanding, equaling 404,440,809 total shares of common stock outstanding and 38,533,271 Warrants outstanding.
The Corporation is authorized to issue 25,000,000 shares of preferred stock having a par value of $0.0001 per share, and the Corporation's board of directors has the authority to determine the rights, preferences, privileges, and restrictions, including voting rights, of those shares. As of September 30, 2021, there were no shares of preferred stock issued and outstanding.
The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in accordance with GAAP. Under the guidance in ASC 805, Legacy Clover is treated as the "acquirer" for financial reporting purposes. As such, Legacy Clover is deemed the accounting predecessor of the combined business, and Clover, as the parent company of the combined business, is the successor SEC registrant, meaning that Legacy Clover's financial statements for previous periods are disclosed in the Corporation’s periodic reports filed with the SEC. The Business Combination will have a significant impact on the Corporation's future reported financial position and results as a consequence of the reverse recapitalization. The most significant change in Clover's future reported financial position and results is an estimated net increase in cash (as compared to the Corporation's consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2020) of approximately $670.0 million. The redemption included approximately $400.0 million in proceeds from the PIPE Investment that was consummated substantially simultaneously with the Business Combination, offset by additional transaction costs incurred in connection with the Business Combination. The estimated transaction costs for the Business Combination were approximately $61.0 million, of which $29.0 million represents deferred underwriter fees related to SCH's initial public offering.
The transaction closed on January 7, 2021, and on the following day the Corporation's Class A Common Stock and Public Warrants were listed on the Nasdaq Global Select Market (Nasdaq) under the symbols "CLOV" and "CLOVW," respectively, for trading in the public market.
See also Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable), Note 10 (Warrants Payable), and Note 14 (Convertible Preferred Stock) for additional information regarding changes to the instruments as a result of the Business Combination.


4. Investment Securities
The following tables present amortized cost and fair values of investments as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively:
September 30, 2021
Amortized cost
Accumulated unrealized gains
Accumulated unrealized losses
Fair value
(in thousands)
Investment securities, held-to-maturity
U.S. government and government agencies and authorities
$695 $42 $(10)$727 
Investment securities, available-for-sale
U.S. government and government agencies and authorities
167,935 37 (647)167,325 
Total investment securities
$168,630 $79 $(657)$168,052 

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December 31, 2020
Amortized cost
Accumulated unrealized gains
Accumulated unrealized losses
Fair value
(in thousands)
Investment securities, held-to-maturity
U.S. government and government agencies and authorities
$694 $43 $— $737 
Investment securities, available-for-sale
U.S. government and government agencies and authorities
53,953 51 (41)53,963 
Total investment securities
$54,647 $94 $(41)$54,700 
The following table presents the amortized cost and fair value of debt securities as of September 30, 2021, by contractual maturity:
September 30, 2021Held-to-maturityAvailable-for-sale
Amortized costFair valueAmortized costFair value
(in thousands)
Due within one year$305 $308 $21,139 $21,142 
Due after one year through five years15 16 141,835 141,352 
Due after five years through ten years265 256 4,961 4,831 
Due after ten years110 147 — — 
Total$695 $727 $167,935 $167,325 
For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, net investment income, which is included within other income in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss, was derived from the following sources:
Three Months Ended
September 30,
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
2021202020212020
(in thousands)
Cash and cash equivalents$— $$— $108 
Short-term investments62 519 139 1,141 
Investment securities117 303 201 977 
Investment income, net$179 $823 $340 $2,226 
Gross unrealized losses and fair values aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position were as follows at September 30, 2021:
September 30, 2021Less than 12 monthsGreater than 12 monthsTotal
Fair valueUnrealized lossFair valueUnrealized lossFair valueUnrealized loss
(in thousands, except number of positions)
U.S. government and government agencies$— $— $71,620 $(657)$71,620 $(657)
Total$— $— $71,620 $(657)$71,620 $(657)
Number of positions— 14 14 
As of September 30, 2021, all securities were investment grade, with credit ratings of AA+ or higher by S&P. Unrealized losses on investment grade securities are principally related to changes in interest rates or changes in issuer or sector related credit spreads since the securities were acquired. The gross unrealized investment losses as of September 30, 2021, were deemed to be temporary, based on, among other things:
The duration of time and the relative magnitude to which fair values of these securities have been below their amortized cost was not indicative of an other-than-temporary impairment loss;
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The absence of compelling evidence that would cause the Corporation to call into question the financial condition or near-term prospects of the issuer of the applicable security; and
The Corporation's ability and intent to hold the applicable security for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery.
The Corporation may ultimately record a realized loss after having originally concluded that the decline in value was temporary. Risks and uncertainties are inherent in the methodology the Corporation uses to assess other-than-temporary declines in value. Risks and uncertainties could include, but are not limited to, incorrect assumptions about financial condition, liquidity or future prospects, inadequacy of any underlying collateral, and unfavorable changes in economic conditions or social trends, interest rates or credit ratings.
Proceeds from sales and maturities of investment securities, inclusive of short-term investments, and related gross realized gains (losses) which are included within other income in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss, were as follows for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively:
Three Months Ended
September 30,
Nine Months Ended
September 30,
2021202020212020
(in thousands)
Proceeds from sales of investment securities$89,997 $71,049 $126,862 $166,024 
Proceeds from maturities of investment securities50,000 9,600 250,265 56,701 
Gross realized gains504 24 540 
Gross realized losses— — (77)— 
Net realized gains (losses)$$504 $(53)$540 
As of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, the Corporation had $11.2 million and $7.5 million, respectively, in deposits with various states and regulatory bodies that are included as part of the Corporation's investment balances.

5. Fair Value Measurements
The following table presents a summary of fair value measurements for financial instruments as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively:
September 30, 2021Level 1Level 2Level 3
Total fair
value
(in thousands)
U.S. government and government agencies$— $167,325 $— $167,325 
Total assets at fair value$— $167,325 $— $167,325 
December 31, 2020Level 1Level 2Level 3
Total fair
value
(in thousands)
U.S. government and government agencies$— $53,963 $— $53,963 
Total assets at fair value$— $53,963 $— $53,963 
Derivative liabilities$— $— $44,810 $44,810 
Warrants payable— — 97,782 97,782 
Total liabilities at fair value$— $— $142,592 $142,592 
See Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable), Note 10 (Warrants Payable), and Note 11 (Derivative Liabilities) for additional information regarding liabilities.
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The fair value of the convertible securities was based on Level 3 inputs, which were unobservable and reflect management’s best estimate of what market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk. There was no fair value associated with convertible securities at September 30, 2021, due to the conversion of the securities to shares of the Corporation’s common stock due to the completion of the Business Combination, and the estimated fair value of convertible securities was $949.6 million at December 31, 2020. The estimated fair value of the convertible securities and derivative liabilities at December 31, 2020, was calculated as the product of (i) the number of conversion shares at the valuation date and (ii) the marketable value per common share at the valuation date.
The significant unobservable inputs used in the Black-Scholes model to measure the warrants payable that are categorized within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, as of the year ended December 31, 2020, are as follows:
December 31, 2020Preferred stock purchase warrantsCommon stock purchase warrants
Beginning stock priceN/A$30.14 
Strike priceN/A1.04 
Expected volatilityN/A56.0 %
Expected termN/A0.02 years
Risk-free interest rateN/A0.09 %
Discount factorN/A13.0 

There were no changes in balances of Level 3 financial liabilities during the three months ended September 30, 2021. The changes in balances of Level 3 financial liabilities during the three months ended September 30, 2020, and the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, are as follows:
Convertible securitiesDerivative liabilitiesWarrants payableTotal
(in thousands)
Balance, June 30, 2020
$285,166 $119,167 $29,424 $433,757 
Issuances— — — — 
Settlements— — — — 
Transfers in— — — — 
Transfers out— — — — 
Total realized losses (gains)95,477 (68,081)19,978 47,374 
Balance, September 30, 2020
$380,643 $51,086 $49,402 $481,131 
Convertible securitiesDerivative liabilitiesWarrants payableTotal
(in thousands)
Balance, December 31, 2020
$949,553 $44,810 $97,782 $1,092,145 
Issuances— — — — 
Settlements(949,553)(44,810)(97,782)(1,092,145)
Transfers in— — — — 
Transfers out— — — — 
Total realized losses (gains)— — — — 
Balance, September 30, 2021
$— $— $— $— 
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Convertible securitiesDerivative liabilitiesWarrants payableTotal
(in thousands)
Balance, December 31, 2019
$251,885 $138,561 $17,672 $408,118 
Issuances— — — — 
Settlements— — — — 
Transfers in— — — — 
Transfers out— — — — 
Total realized losses (gains)128,758 (87,475)31,730 73,013 
Balance, September 30, 2020
$380,643 $51,086 $49,402 $481,131 

In addition to the Level 3 financial liabilities in the table above, on September 25, 2020, Seek Insurance Services, Inc. (Seek), a field marketing organization and an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of the Corporation, entered into a note purchase agreement with a third-party investor and issued a note (the “Seek Convertible Note”) in the principal amount of $20.0 million. For additional information, see Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable). As of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, both the carrying values, which includes accrued interest, and the fair values of the 2020 Convertible Note were $21.6 million and $20.4 million, respectively, and these were considered Level 3 financial liabilities.
There were no transfers in or out of Level 3 financial assets or liabilities for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 or 2020.
Warrants
The Warrants were accounted for as liabilities in accordance with ASC 815-40 and are presented within warrants payable on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. The warrant liabilities were measured at fair value at inception and measured on a recurring basis, with changes in fair value presented within change in fair value of warrants payable in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. On July 22, 2021, the Company issued a press release stating that it would redeem all of its Warrants. The end of the redemption period was September 9, 2021, at which time the Corporation redeemed all unexercised Warrants at a price of $0.10 per warrant. As of September 30, 2021, no Warrants were outstanding. For additional information, please see Note 10 (Warrants Payable).

Liability Measurement
The Warrants were measured at fair value on a recurring basis. The Corporation classified the Warrants as a liability due to certain settlement terms and provisions related to certain tender offers and indexation characteristics following the Business Combination and accounted for them as liability instruments in accordance with ASC 815, adjusting the fair value at the end of each reporting period. Additionally, the Corporation determined that the Public Warrants were classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy as the fair value was equal to the publicly traded price of the Public Warrants, and the Private Placement Warrants were classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy as the fair value was estimated using the price of the Public Warrants. In connection with the redemption, effective August 24, 2021, the Public Warrants were delisted and classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy as the fair value of the Public Warrants was based on proportional changes in the price of the Corporation’s common stock. There were no Private Warrants outstanding at August 24, 2021. See Note 10 (Warrants Payable) for additional information on the exercises and redemption of Warrants.
The following table presents the changes in the fair value of warrants payable:
September 30, 2021Public and Private Placement Warrants
(in thousands)
Initial measurement, January 7, 2021
$147,582 
Mark-to-market adjustment(66,214)
Warrants exercised(81,283)
Warrants redeemed(85)
Warrants payable balance, September 30, 2021
$— 
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6. Healthcare Receivables
Included within healthcare receivables are pharmaceutical rebates which are accrued as they are earned and estimated based on contracted rebate rates, eligible amounts submitted to the manufacturers by the Corporation's pharmacy manager, pharmacy utilization volume and historical collection patterns. As of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, the Corporation recognized rebate receivables of approximately $30.2 million and $26.6 million, respectively. In addition to pharmaceutical rebates, Medicare Part D settlement receivables, member premium receivables and other CMS receivables included in healthcare receivables totaled $4.5 million and $12.1 million at September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively.

7. Related Party Transactions
Related party agreements
The Corporation has various contracts with IJKG Opco LLC (d/b/a CarePoint Health - Bayonne Medical Center), Hudson Hospital Opco LLC (d/b/a CarePoint Health - Christ Hospital) and Hoboken University Medical Center Opco LLC (d/b/a CarePoint Health - Hoboken University Medical Center), which collectively do business as the CarePoint Health System (CarePoint Health). CarePoint Health is ultimately held and controlled by Mr. Vivek Garipalli, the Chief Executive Officer and stockholder of the Corporation. The Corporation contracts with CarePoint Health for the provision of inpatient and hospital-based outpatient services. Expenses and fees incurred related to these contracts, recorded in net medical claims incurred, were $1.7 million and $1.9 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and $9.2 million and $5.3 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
The Corporation has contracted with Rogue Trading, LLC (Rogue), a marketing services provider. The Corporation’s President and Chief Technology Officer, Andrew Toy, is related to the Chief Executive Officer of Rogue. Expenses and fees related to these contracts were immaterial and $0.3 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively. Expenses and fees related to these contracts were $0.1 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.
The Corporation has a contract with Medical Records Exchange, LLC (d/b/a ChartFast) pursuant to which we receive administrative services related to medical records via ChartFast’s electronic applications and web portal platform. ChartFast is ultimately owned and controlled by Mr. Garipalli. Expenses and fees incurred related to this agreement were $0.1 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, and $0.1 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.
On July 2, 2021, the Corporation signed a contract with Thyme Care, Inc. (Thyme Care), an oncology benefit management company, through which Thyme Care will provide concierge cancer coordination services to the Corporation’s Medicare Advantage members in New Jersey and develop a provider network to help ensure member access to high-value oncology care. Mr. Garipalli is a member of Thyme Care’s board of directors.
Securities payable to related parties
The Corporation has entered into various securities payable with certain related parties as further discussed in Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable).

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8. Unpaid Claims
Activity in the liability for unpaid claims, including claims adjustment expenses, for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, is summarized as follows:
Nine Months Ended September 30,20212020
(in thousands)
Gross and net balance, beginning of period$103,976 $77,886 
Incurred related to:
Current year1,092,280 425,941 
Prior years17,095 (15,401)
Total incurred1,109,375 410,540 
Paid related to:
Current year963,779 339,252 
Prior years109,362 55,559 
Total paid1,073,141 394,811 
Gross and net balance, end of period$140,210 $93,615 
Unpaid claims as of September 30, 2021, were $140.2 million. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, $109.4 million was paid for incurred claims attributable to insured events of prior years. An unfavorable development of $17.1 million was recognized during the nine months ended September 30, 2021, resulting from the Corporation's claims experience, likely due to provider administrative challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic. A favorable development of $15.4 million was recognized during the nine months ended September 30, 2020, resulting from the actualization of fee-for-service claims. Original estimates are increased or decreased, as additional information becomes known regarding individual claims. The ratio of current year medical claims paid as a percentage of current year net medical claims incurred was 88.2% for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and 79.6% for the nine months ended September 30, 2020. This ratio serves as an indicator of claims processing speed, indicating that claims were processed at a faster rate during the nine months ended September 30, 2021, than during the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Beginning in second quarter 2021, the Corporation began participating in the DC Model, which accounted for approximately 42.4% of the Corporation’s total incurred claims as of September 30, 2021.
The Corporation uses a variety of standard actuarial techniques to establish unpaid claims reserves. Management estimates are supported by the Corporation's actuarial analysis. The Corporation utilizes an internal actuarial team to review the adequacy of unpaid claim and unpaid claim adjustment expense. The estimation of claim costs is inherently difficult and requires significant judgment. The estimation has considerable inherent variability and can vary significantly depending upon several factors, including medical cost trends and claim payment patterns, general economic conditions and regulatory changes. The time value of money is not taken into account for the purposes of calculating the liability for unpaid claims. Management believes that the current reserves are adequate based on currently available information.

9. Notes and Securities Payable
Non-convertible Notes
On March 21, 2017, the Corporation entered into a loan facility (the "Loan Facility") for an aggregate principal amount of $60.0 million with the proceeds used to pay all obligations under a $30.0 million 2015 senior secured note, and to provide additional working capital for the Corporation's subsidiaries. The Loan Facility was secured by the assets of the Corporation. The initial obligation of $40.0 million had a maturity date of March 1, 2022, and was subject to an interest rate of 11.0%, payable monthly, with the majority of principal payments commencing 36 months prior to the maturity date. The additional $20.0 million obligation had a maturity date of October 1, 2022, and was subject to an interest rate of 11.3%, payable monthly, with the majority of principal payments commencing 36 months prior to the maturity date. In conjunction with the Loan Facility, the Corporation issued warrants. See Note 10 (Warrants Payable) for additional information.
On June 29, 2021, the Corporation voluntarily paid the remaining principal of $20.7 million and interest of $0.2 million, thereby terminating the Loan Facility.
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Convertible Securities
Pursuant to that certain Convertible Agreement, dated December 27, 2018, between the Corporation and certain qualified institutional buyers, including entities affiliated with the Corporation, for an aggregate principal amount of up to $500.0 million (the "Convertible Agreement"), the Corporation issued convertible securities during 2019 in multiple tranches. On October 5, 2020, the Corporation entered into the Merger Agreement with SCH and simultaneously amended the Convertible Agreement, pursuant to which the convertible securities of Legacy Clover converted into Class Z common stock in connection with the Business Combination. All Class Z common stock converted into Class B Common Stock as of the Closing. Additionally, the conversion incurred a 9.4% charge to account for dilution after the Business Combination to convert the securities as if they had been converted under the mandatory qualified public offering conversion. On January 7, 2021, the Business Combination was completed and the convertible securities were redeemed or converted into a total of 36,117,708 shares of Class Z common stock depending on whether each tranche's conversion price was a conversion or share-settled redemption feature as follows:
Redemption: The February, March, and May 2019 tranches were redeemed for 34,806,921 shares of Class Z common stock pursuant to the share-settled redemption feature. The redemption of the convertible securities was accounted for as a debt extinguishment as they contained a beneficial conversion feature (BCF), and were redeemed prior to the stated maturity date. As the extinguishment date intrinsic value of the BCF was in excess of the fair value of the shares issued to settle the convertible securities, the full amount of the settlement consideration was treated as the price of reacquiring the BCF. As there was no remaining consideration available to allocate to the re-acquisition of the convertible securities, the extinguishment resulted in a gain equal to the full carrying value of the convertible securities of $126.8 million. This gain was treated as a capital contribution and was recorded as an increase in additional paid in capital as the convertible securities were issued to affiliates of the Corporation. The $126.8 million is comprised of: (a) the carrying value of the tranches of $74.6 million, (b) accrued interest of $7.4 million, and (c) the fair value of the embedded derivative of $44.8 million.
Conversion: The August 2019 tranche converted into 1,310,787 shares of Class Z common stock pursuant to the conversion feature. Prior to the conversion, the carrying value of the tranche was $2.6 million and accrued interest was $0.4 million. As the converted securities contained a BCF, the $13.0 million unamortized debt discount remaining at the date of conversion was recognized in amortization of notes and securities discount in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss.
After giving effect to the Exchange Ratio, pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement, these shares of Class Z common stock were converted into 74,694,107 shares of Class B Common Stock upon the closing of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information on the Business Combination.
The convertible securities bore a yield ("interest") at the increasing rates noted below which compounded semi-annually, and would mature April 1, 2023, unless earlier converted, repurchased, or extended. The interest rate and embedded feature discount factor varied based on the length of time elapsed from the issue date of the securities. The interest rates began at 6.5% for the first twelve-month period through the first anniversary of the security issue date, increasing ratably on a semi-annual basis, to 13.5% at the third anniversary of the security issue date until the convertible securities ceased to be outstanding. The embedded feature discount factors began at 75.0% for the first twelve-month period through the first anniversary of the security issue date, decreasing ratably on a semi-annual basis, to 55.0% at the forty-two month anniversary of the security issue date until the convertible securities ceased to be outstanding.
The carrying amount of the convertible securities was $76.5 million at December 31, 2020. The unamortized discount was $337.3 million at December 31, 2020. Amortization of the debt discount was approximately $14.9 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Interest expense on the convertible securities was $22.0 million during the nine months ended 2020. The effective interest rate, inclusive of amortization of the discount and the contractual rate, was 90.3% during the nine months ended September 30, 2020. The results presented as of and for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, above, reflect the impact of the conversion of the convertible securities into common stock in connection with the Business Combination.
Seek Convertible Note
On September 25, 2020, Seek issued the Seek Convertible Note in the principal amount of $20.0 million. The note bears simple interest at an annual rate of 8.0% and matures on September 25, 2023, unless earlier accelerated, converted, or paid in full. The outstanding principal and any accrued but unpaid interest will become immediately due and payable at the election of the note holder upon the occurrence of any event of default as defined in the note. The outstanding principal and accrued but unpaid interest will convert into an equity interest in Seek if prior to maturity, repayment or conversion of the note: (1) the note holder elects to convert the note, (2) upon the closing of Seek's next equity financing; or (3) upon consummation of an initial public offering of Seek's common stock or a SPAC or reverse merger transaction with Seek.
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The Corporation analyzed the embedded features for derivative accounting consideration and determined that the features are clearly and closely related to the debt host and do not require separate accounting as a derivative.
The carrying amount of the note was $19.9 million at both September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020. The Corporation capitalized $0.1 million of issuance costs which are being amortized using the effective interest method over the term of the note. Unamortized debt issuance costs were $0.1 million at both September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020. Amortization of the debt issuance costs and interest expense on the note was $0.4 million and $1.2 million during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively. Amortization of the debt issuance costs and interest expense on the note was immaterial during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.
The effective interest rate was 8.2% during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, and during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.

10. Warrants Payable
Legacy Warrants

In conjunction with the Loan Facility, the Corporation issued warrants to purchase 1,266,284 shares of the Corporation's Series D preferred stock at an exercise price of $9.38 per share. On October 5, 2020, the Corporation entered into the Merger Agreement with SCH and simultaneously amended the warrants to be automatically exercisable for common stock in connection with the Business Combination. The warrants were accounted for as derivative instruments, and the initial fair value of approximately $1.2 million, which was calculated using a Black-Scholes based valuation model, was recorded as a discount to the carrying amount of the Loan Facility. This discount was being amortized using the effective interest method over the term of the Loan Facility. The warrants were recorded as liabilities and were being marked to market at each reporting period.
In September 2015, the Corporation issued warrants to purchase 2,100,000 shares of the Corporation's common stock at an exercise price of $1.04 per share. The warrants were also contingently exercisable for an additional 2,100,000 shares based proportionally on the aggregate principal amounts of additional notes borrowed by the Corporation.

Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, the Loan Facility warrants and the September 2015 warrants automatically converted into 3,484,154 shares of Legacy Clover common stock and, after giving effect to the Exchange Ratio converted into 7,205,490 shares of Class B Common Stock upon the closing of the Business Combination.
Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants
As a result of the Business Combination, the Corporation assumed, as of January 7, 2021, Public Warrants to purchase an aggregate of 27,599,938 shares of the Corporation's Class A Common Stock and Private Placement Warrants to purchase an aggregate of 10,933,333 shares of the Corporation's Class A Common Stock. Each whole Warrant entitled the registered holder to purchase one whole share of Class A Common Stock at a price of $11.50 per share, at any time commencing on April 24, 2021.
The Warrants were accounted for as liabilities in accordance with ASC 815-40 and are presented within warrants payable on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. The warrant liabilities were measured at fair value at inception and on a recurring basis until redeemed, with changes in fair value presented within change in fair value of warrants payable in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. See Note 5 (Fair Value Measurements) for additional information.

On July 22, 2021, the Company issued a press release stating that it would redeem all of its Warrants that remained outstanding on August 23, 2021, the redemption date, for a redemption price of $0.10 per Warrant. On August 25, 2021, the Company announced that it was extending the period during which holders of the Public Warrants could exercise the Warrants to September 9, 2021, at which time any unexercised Public Warrants would be redeemed at a price of $0.10 per Warrant. Payment upon exercise of the Warrants could be made either (i) in cash, at an exercise price of $11.50 per share of Class A Common Stock or (ii) on a "cashless basis" in which the exercising holder received 0.249 shares of Class A Common Stock per Warrant shares of Class A Common Stock.

Prior to the redemption date, 33,932 Public Warrants were exercised for cash, and 26,716,041 were exercised on a cashless basis in exchange for an aggregate of 6,685,865 shares of Common Stock, in each case in accordance with the terms of the Warrant Agreement, representing 96.9% of the Public Warrants. In addition, all of the Private Placement Warrants were exercised on a cashless basis in exchange for an aggregate of 2,722,399 shares of Common Stock, in accordance with the terms of the Warrant Agreement. Total cash proceeds generated from exercises of the Public Warrants were $0.4 million. The remaining unexercised 849,965 Public
20


Warrants were redeemed by the Corporation for $0.1 million. In connection with the redemption, the Public Warrants were delisted, and no Warrants were outstanding at September 30, 2021.

11. Derivative Liabilities
In connection with the $373.8 million of convertible securities issued in 2019, the Corporation determined that certain of the conversion and redemption features were embedded derivatives and were bifurcated from the host instrument and accounted for as embedded derivative instruments. In connection with the convertible securities, the Corporation recognized a capital contribution of $44.8 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2021. This capital contribution of $44.8 million was recorded as an increase in additional paid in capital as the notes were issued to affiliates of the Corporation. The Corporation recognized a gain of $68.1 million and $87.5 million from activity related to derivative liabilities in connection with the convertible securities during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, respectively, which was recognized in gain on derivative in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. Upon the completion of the Business Combination with SCH on January 7, 2021, the derivative balance was extinguished as of January 7, 2021. See Note 3 (Business Combination), Note 5 (Fair Value Measurements), and Note 9 (Notes and Securities Payable) for additional information.

12. Letter of Credit
On April 19, 2018, the Corporation entered into a secured letter of credit agreement (the “Letter”) for up to an aggregate amount of $2.5 million with a commercial lender that renews on an annual basis. The Letter bears an interest rate of 0.75%. There was an unused balance of $2.5 million at both September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020.


13. Leases
Operating Leases
The Corporation leases office space in New Jersey, Minnesota, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, California, and Hong Kong under non-cancelable operating leases, as further described below. For each lease the Corporation recorded a right-of-use (ROU) asset and lease liability at the earlier of the ASC 842 effective date or lease commencement date. The Corporation utilizes the straight-line method of recognizing lease expense. However, the Corporation is required to pay certain variable executory costs including common area maintenance, real estate taxes, and insurance that are expensed as incurred. These variable costs are excluded from the measurement of leases. Certain of the Corporation’s leases include options to renew, with renewal terms that can extend the lease term. The exercise of lease renewal options is at the Corporation’s sole discretion. The Corporation is not reasonably certain that it will exercise the renewal options described in the individual lease descriptions below. Therefore, these options are not recognized as part of the ROU asset and lease liability.
The Corporation subleases certain of its leases to third parties for which it receives rental income to manage occupancy costs. These subleases are classified as operating leases.

Certain of the Corporation’s leases are being considered for subletting.

Mallory Green Lease:

On September 22, 2021, the Corporation entered into an agreement to lease office space for its new corporate headquarters in Franklin, Tennessee, for a period of 37 months.
Montgomery Lease:
From May 2020 through April 9, 2021, the Corporation was in default with respect to its agreement to lease office space in Jersey City, New Jersey (the "Montgomery Lease"), for not paying rent owed to the lessor. The Corporation accrued for all interest owed and began reducing its security deposit asset in lieu of recording rental payments. On April 9, 2021, the Corporation replenished its security deposit and, therefore, was no longer in default with respect to the Montgomery Lease.
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Summary of Lease Costs Recognized Under ASC 842:
The following table contains a summary of the lease costs recognized under ASC 842 and other information pertaining to the Corporation's operating leases for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021:
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021
(in thousands)
Operating lease cost$1,126 
Variable lease cost123 
Short-term lease cost15 
Sublease income(650)
Total lease cost$614 
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
(in thousands)
Operating lease cost$3,351 
Variable lease cost391 
Short-term lease cost45 
Sublease income(2,077)
Total lease cost$1,710 
Other information
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities$3,894 
Weighted-average remaining lease term4.4 years
Weighted-average discount rate10.26 %
Pursuant to the terms of the Corporation's non-cancelable lease agreements in effect at December 31, 2020, the following table summarizes the Corporation's maturities of lease liabilities as of September 30, 2021:
(in thousands)
2021$1,321 
20223,001 
20231,493 
20241,157 
20251,149 
Thereafter2,639 
Total lease payments10,760 
Less: imputed interest(2,213)
Total$8,547 

14. Convertible Preferred Stock
Each share of Legacy Clover's preferred stock was convertible at the option of the holder, at any time and from time to time, and without the payment of additional consideration by the holder thereof, into a number of fully paid and non-assessable shares of common stock as is determined by dividing the applicable original issue price by the applicable conversion price as described in Note 17 (Preferred Stock) to financial statements in the Form 8-K/A in effect at the time of conversion.
Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, all outstanding shares of Legacy Clover's preferred stock automatically converted into 139,444,346 shares of Class B Common Stock after giving effect to the Exchange Ratio upon the closing of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information on the Business Combination.

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15. Employee Benefit Plans
Employee Savings Plan
The Corporation has a defined contribution retirement savings plan (the “401(k) Plan”) covering eligible employees, which includes safe harbor matching contributions based on the amount of employees' contributions to the 401(k) Plan. The Corporation contributes to the 401(k) Plan annually 100.0% of the first 4.0% compensation that is contributed by the employee up to 4.0% of eligible annual compensation. The Corporation's service contributions to the 401(k) Plan amounted to approximately $0.3 million and $0.3 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and $0.9 million and $1.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and are included in salaries and benefits on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. The Corporation's cash match is invested pursuant to the participant's contribution direction. Employer contributions are immediately 100.0% vested.

Stock-based Compensation
The Corporation's 2020 Equity Incentive Plan (the "2020 Plan") and 2020 Management Incentive Plan (the “2020 MIP”) provide for grants of restricted stocks units (RSUs) and/or options to acquire shares of the Corporation's common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, to employees, directors, officers, and consultants of the Corporation. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Corporation approved the 2020 Plan and the 2020 MIP, and the Corporation’s 2014 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2014 Plan” and, collectively with the 2020 Plan and the 2020 MIP, the “Plans”) was retired.
The maximum number of shares of the Corporation's common stock reserved for issuance over the term of the Plans, shares outstanding under the Plans, and shares remaining under the Plans, after giving effect to the Exchange Ratio, as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, were as follows:
September 30, 2021Shares Authorized Under PlansShares Outstanding Under PlansShares Remaining Under Plans
2014 Plan
54,402,264 42,441,719 N/A
2020 Plan
30,641,401 1,782,986 28,858,415 
2020 MIP
33,426,983 33,426,983 — 
December 31, 2020Shares Authorized Under PlanShares Outstanding Under PlanShares Remaining Under Plan
2014 Plan
54,402,264 36,557,759 17,844,505 
Effective as of the closing of the Business Combination, the 2014 Plan terminated, at which time the outstanding awards previously granted thereunder were assumed by the Corporation, and no new awards are available for grant under the 2014 Plan. Shares that are expired, terminated, surrendered or canceled under the 2014 Plan without having been fully exercised are available for awards under the 2020 Plan. Shares may be issued from authorized but unissued Corporation stock.
The Plans are administered by the Talent and Compensation Committee of the Corporation’s Board of Directors (the “Compensation Committee”). The options are subject to the terms and conditions applicable to options granted under the Plans, as described in the applicable Plan and the applicable stock option grant agreement. The exercise prices, vesting and other restrictions applicable to the stock options are determined at the discretion of the Compensation Committee, except that the exercise price per share of incentive stock options may not be less than 100.0% of the fair value of a share of common stock on the date of grant. Stock options awarded under the Plans expire 10 years after the grant date. Incentive stock options and non-statutory options granted to employees, directors, officers and consultants of the Corporation typically vest over four or five years. RSU awards are subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the Plans and the applicable RSU grant agreement. Vesting and other restrictions applicable to RSU awards are determined at the discretion of the Compensation Committee. The number of shares of common stock subject to an RSU award is determined by dividing the cash value of an RSU award by the average closing price of a share of common stock for the 90 trading days ending on the date of grant, and such awards typically vest over four years from the grant date. The total estimated fair value is amortized as an expense over the requisite service period as approved by the Compensation Committee.
The Corporation granted options to purchase 1,937,968 shares of common stock during the nine months ended September 30, 2021. The Corporation recorded stock-based compensation expense for options, RSUs, performance restricted stock units (PRSUs) granted under the Plans and discounts offered in connection with the Corporation’s 2020 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP) of $46.8
23


million and $132.5 million during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, and such expenses are presented in salaries and benefits in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. Compensation cost presented in salaries and benefits in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss were as follows:
Three Months Ended September 30,20212020
(in thousands)
Stock options$1,665 $1,500 
RSUs17,396 — 
PRSUs27,675 — 
ESPP67 — 
Total compensation cost recognized for stock-based compensation plans$46,803 $1,500 
Nine Months Ended September 30,20212020
(in thousands)
Stock options$6,734 $4,949 
RSUs45,725 — 
PRSUs80,016 — 
ESPP67 — 
Total compensation cost recognized for stock-based compensation plans$132,542 $4,949 
As of September 30, 2021, there was approximately $463.7 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to unvested stock options, RSUs, PRSUs, and the ESPP, estimated to be recognized over a period of 4.27 years. As of December 31, 2020, there was approximately $14.9 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to unvested stock options.
Stock Options
The assumptions that the Corporation used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the grant-date fair value of stock options granted for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, were as follows:
Nine Months Ended September 30,20212020
Weighted-average risk-free interest rate1.06 %0.84 %
Expected term (in years)6.064.66
Expected volatility37.74 %34.60 %
Expected dividend yield— — 

A summary of option activity under the 2020 Plan during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 is as follows:
Number of optionsWeighted-average exercise price
Outstanding, January 1, 2021
— $— 
Granted during 2021
1,937,968 8.88 
Exercised— — 
Forfeited(154,982)8.87 
Outstanding, September 30, 2021
1,782,986 $8.88 
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A summary of option activity under the 2014 Plan during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 is as follows:
Number of optionsWeighted-average exercise price
Outstanding, January 1, 2021
36,513,193 $2.26 
Granted during 2021
— — 
Exercised(3,843,472)1.43 
Forfeited(974,874)2.78 
Outstanding, September 30, 2021
31,694,847 $2.29 
The aggregate intrinsic value of stock options is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the stock options and the fair value of the Corporation's common stock for those stock options that had exercise prices lower than the fair value of the Corporation's common stock.
The weighted-average grant date fair value of stock options granted during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 was $3.36 per share and $2.10 per share, respectively.
As of September 30, 2021, outstanding stock options, substantially all of which are expected to vest, had an aggregate intrinsic value of $160.1 million, and a weighted-average remaining contractual term of 7.03 years. As of September 30, 2021, there were 21,210,565 options exercisable under the Plan, with an aggregate intrinsic value of $109.0 million, a weighted-average exercise price of $2.26 per share, and a weighted-average remaining contractual term of 6.34 years. The total value of stock options exercised during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, was $36.4 million and $1.6 million, respectively. Cash received from stock option exercises during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, totaled $5.5 million and $1.0 million, respectively.
Pursuant to the terms of the applicable Plan and stock option award agreement, employees may exercise options at any time after grant while maintaining the original vesting period. The proceeds from exercise of unvested options are recorded as a liability until the option vests at which time the liability is reclassified to equity. If the employee terminates or otherwise forfeits an unvested option that has been exercised, the Corporation must redeem those shares at the original exercise price and remit payment of the forfeited portion of shares back to the employee.
Restricted Stock Units
A summary of total RSU activity for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, is presented below:
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
Granted21,035,614 
Released(131,766)
Forfeited(35,935)
Outstanding, September 30, 2021
20,867,913 
The weighted-average grant date fair value of the RSUs was $14.77 per underlying share.
Performance Restricted Stock Units
The Corporation has granted PRSUs which become eligible to vest if prior to the vesting date the average closing price of one share of the Corporation's common stock for ninety consecutive days equals or exceeds a specified price (the "Market PRSUs"). The grant date fair value of the Market PRSUs is recognized as expense over the vesting period under the accelerated attribution method and is not adjusted in future periods for the success or failure to achieve the specified market condition.

The weighted-average grant date fair value of Market PRSUs granted during the nine months ended September 30, 2021, was $9.58 per underlying share. There were no Market PRSUs granted prior to 2021. The grant date fair value of Market PRSUs was determined
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using a Monte Carlo simulation model that incorporated multiple valuation assumptions, including the probability of achieving the specified market condition and the following assumptions:
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
Expected volatility (1)
40.70 %
Risk-free interest rate (2)
0.50 
Dividend yield (3)
— 
(1) Expected volatility is based on a blend of peer group company historical data adjusted for the Corporation's leverage.
(2) Risk-free interest rate based on U.S. Treasury yields with a term equal to the remaining Performance Period as of the grant date.
(3) Dividend yield was assumed to be zero as the Corporation does not anticipate paying dividends.

A summary of total PRSU activity for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, is presented below:
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
Granted27,699,171 
Non-vested at September 30, 2021
27,699,171 
As of September 30, 2021, there was $185.4 million of unrecognized share-based compensation expense related to PRSUs, which is expected to be recognized over a period of 4.27 years.

2020 Employee Stock Purchase Plan

On October 5, 2020, SCH’s board of directors adopted, and on January 6, 2021, stockholders approved the ESPP. The ESPP provides a means by which eligible employees and/or eligible service providers of either the Corporation or designated related corporations and affiliates may be given an opportunity to purchase shares of Class A common stock at a 15.0% discount from the fair market value of the common stock as determined on a specific date at six-month intervals. Subject to adjustments provided in the ESPP, the maximum number of shares of common stock that may be purchased under the ESPP is 2,785,582 shares, and the maximum number of shares that may be purchased on any single purchase date by any one participant is 5,000 shares. As of September 30, 2021, 2,785,582 shares of Class A common stock were available for issuance under the ESPP.

On the first day of each fiscal year, beginning with the 2022 fiscal year and ending on (and including) the first day of the 2030 fiscal year, the calculation of the maximum number of ESPP shares shall include automatic increases in an amount equal to the lesser of (i) 1.0% of the total number of shares of Class A common stock outstanding on the last day of the calendar month prior to the date of such automatic increase, and (ii) such number of shares of Class A common stock as determined by the administrator of the ESPP; provided that the maximum number of shares of Class A common stock reserved under the ESPP shall not exceed 10.0% of the total outstanding capital stock of the Corporation (inclusive of the shares reserved under the ESPP) as of January 7, 2021, on an as-converted basis.

The initial offering period for the ESPP is five months, commencing on September 1, 2021, and ending on January 31, 2022. As of the date of this report, no shares of the Corporation’s common stock have been purchased or distributed pursuant to the ESPP.

The assumptions that the Corporation used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the fair value of the purchase rights under the ESPP for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, were as follows:

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
Weighted-average risk-free interest rate0.06 %
Expected term (in years)0.42
Expected volatility147.42 %
Equity warrants
In November 2016 and December 2017, the Corporation issued warrants to purchase 139,629 shares of the Corporation's common stock at an exercise price of $2.61 per share, and 122,052 shares of the Corporation's common stock at an exercise price of $3.45 per share, respectively, as part of payment to certain providers for services provided to the Corporation. These warrants were automatically exercised in connection with the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for additional information.
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The total fair value of warrants vested during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, was $0.0 million and $4.0 million, respectively.
A summary of activity relating to the warrants of the service providers during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, is as follows:
Number of warrantsWeighted-average exercise price
Outstanding, December 31, 2019
261,681 $3.00 
Granted during 2020
— — 
Exercised— — 
Forfeited— — 
Outstanding, September 30, 2020
261,681 $3.00 
Outstanding, December 31, 2020
261,681 $3.00 
Granted during 2021
— — 
Exercised(261,681)3.00 
Forfeited— — 
Outstanding, September 30, 2021
— $— 

16. Income Taxes
The consolidated effective tax rate of the Corporation for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, was (0.0%) and (0.0%), respectively. The consolidated effective tax rate of the Corporation for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, was (0.0%) and (0.0%), respectively. The Corporation continues to be in a net operating loss and net deferred tax asset position. As a result, and in accordance with accounting standards, the Corporation recorded a valuation allowance to reduce the value of the net deferred tax assets to zero. The Corporation believes that as of September 30, 2021, it had no material uncertain tax positions. Interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax expense (benefits) are recognized in income tax expense, when applicable.
There were no material liabilities for interest and penalties accrued as of September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020.
On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) was signed into law in the U.S. to provide certain relief in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, governments around the world have enacted or implemented various forms of tax relief measures in response to the economic conditions in the wake of COVID-19. On December 27, 2020, the "Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021" was signed into law in the U.S. to amend or extend several significant COVID related relief provisions of the CARES Act. The Corporation has determined that neither the CARES Act and Consolidated Appropriations Act nor changes to income tax laws or regulations in other jurisdictions had a significant impact on the Corporation’s effective tax rate.


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17. Net (Loss) Income Per Share
Net (Loss) Income Per Share
Basic and diluted net (loss) income per share attributable to common stockholders was calculated as follows:
Three Months Ended September 30,
20212020
(in thousands, except per share data)
Net (loss) income$(34,527)$12,758 
Net (loss) income attributable to common stockholders(34,527)4,966 
Basic weighted average number of common shares and common share equivalents outstanding (1)
414,572,706 88,863,244 
Diluted weighted average number of common shares and common share equivalents outstanding (1)
414,572,706 248,133,335 
Net (loss) income per share attributable to common stockholders—basic$(0.08)$0.06 
Net (loss) income per share attributable to common stockholders—diluted$(0.08)$0.02 
Nine Months Ended September 30,
20212020
(in thousands, except per share data)
Net loss$(400,555)$(10,001)
Net loss attributable to common stockholders(400,555)(10,001)
Basic and diluted weighted average number of common shares and common share equivalents outstanding(1)
410,417,493 88,616,116 
Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders—basic and diluted$(0.98)$(0.11)
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for details.

Because the Corporation had a net loss during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, and a net loss during the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Corporation’s potentially dilutive securities, which include stock options, restricted stock, preferred stock, and warrants to purchase shares of common stock and preferred stock, have been excluded from the computation of diluted net loss per share, as the effect would be anti-dilutive. Therefore, during these periods, the diluted common shares outstanding equals the average common shares outstanding. The Corporation excluded the following potential common shares, presented based on amounts outstanding at each period end, from the computation of diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders for the periods indicated because including them would have had an anti-dilutive effect:
Three Months Ended September 30,
20212020
Options to purchase common stock (1)
33,477,833 5,183,834 
RSUs21,106,720 — 
Warrants to purchase common stock (as converted to common stock) (1)
— 4,342,956 
Warrants to purchase convertible preferred stock (as converted to common stock) (1)
— 2,618,770 
Total anti-dilutive shares excluded from computation of earnings per share54,584,553 12,145,560 
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Nine Months Ended September 30,
20212020
Options to purchase common stock (1)
33,477,833 37,296,034 
RSUs21,106,720 — 
Convertible preferred stock (as converted to common stock) (1)
— 139,444,346 
Warrants to purchase common stock (as converted to common stock) (1)
— 4,884,132 
Warrants to purchase convertible preferred stock (as converted to common stock) (1)
— 2,618,770 
Total anti-dilutive shares excluded from computation of earnings per share54,584,553 184,243,282 
(1) Prior period results have been adjusted to reflect the exchange of Legacy Clover's common stock for Clover Class B Common Stock at an exchange ratio of approximately 2.0681 in January 2021 as a result of the Business Combination. See Note 3 (Business Combination) for details.

18. Commitments and Contingencies
Legal Actions
Various lawsuits against the Corporation may arise in the ordinary course of the Corporation's business. Contingent liabilities arising from ordinary course litigation, income taxes and other matters are not expected to be material in relation to the financial position of the Corporation. At September 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively, there were no material known contingent liabilities arising outside the normal course of business.
Securities Class Actions and Derivative Litigation
In February 2021, the Corporation and certain of its directors and officers were named as defendants in putative class actions filed in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee: Bond v. Clover Health Investments, Corp. et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00096 (M.D. Tenn.); Kaul v. Clover Health Investments, Corp., et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00101 (M.D. Tenn.); Yaniv v. Clover Health Investments, Corp., et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00109 (M.D. Tenn.); and Tremblay v. Clover Health Investments, Corp., et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00138 (M.D. Tenn.). The complaints asserted violations of sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 10b-5 promulgated under the Exchange Act. The Kaul action asserted additional claims under sections 11 and 15 of the Securities Act.
The complaints generally related to allegations published in an article issued on February 4, 2021, by Hindenburg Research LLC (the “Hindenburg Article”). The complaints sought unspecified damages on behalf of all persons and entities who purchased or acquired Clover securities during the proposed class period (which begins on October 6, 2020, and, depending on the complaint, ends on February 3, 2021, or February 4, 2021), as well as certain other costs.

In April 2021, the Middle District of Tennessee class actions described above were consolidated under Bond v. Clover Health Investments, Corp., et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00096 (M.D. Tenn.) as lead case. The court appointed a lead plaintiff, approved a lead counsel and a liaison counsel, and approved the parties' proposed schedule for filing an amended complaint and the defendants' responses. In June 2021, the lead plaintiff and a named plaintiff filed the amended complaint, asserting violations of sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 10b-5 promulgated under the Exchange Act. The amended complaint names Clover and certain of its officers and directors as defendants and removes certain defendants named in the initial complaints. The amended complaint generally relates to allegations published in the Hindenburg Article and seeks unspecified damages on behalf of all persons and entities other than the defendants who purchased or acquired Clover securities during the proposed class period (which begins on October 6, 2020, and ends on February 3, 2021), as well as certain other costs. The Corporation moved to dismiss the complaint on August 27, 2021, and briefing on that motion is ongoing under the court’s briefing schedule.
Parallel shareholder derivative actions have also been filed, naming Clover as a nominal defendant. The first action was filed in the United States District Court for the District of Delaware and is captioned Furman v. Garipalli, et al., Case No. 1:21-cv-00191 (D. Del.). The complaint asserts violations of sections 10(b) and 21D of the Exchange Act, breach of fiduciary duty, and waste of corporate assets against certain of the Corporation’s directors. It seeks unspecified damages and an order requiring Clover to take certain actions to enhance Clover's corporate governance policies, and procedures. The second and third actions were filed in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee and are captioned Sun v. Garipalli, et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00311 (M.D. Tenn.), and Luthra v. Garipalli, et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00320 (M.D. Tenn.). The complaints assert violations of section 14(a) of the Exchange Act, breach of fiduciary duty, and aiding and abetting a breach of fiduciary duty. The Sun action also asserts unjust enrichment, abuse of control, gross mismanagement, waste of corporate assets, and contribution under section 11(f) of the Securities Act, and sections 10(b) and 21D of the Exchange Act. The complaints name certain current and former officers and directors as
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defendants. They seek unspecified damages and an order requiring Clover to take certain actions to enhance Clover's corporate governance policies and procedures.

The fourth action was filed in the United States District of Delaware and is captioned Wiegand v. Garipalli, et al., Case No. 1:21-cv-01053 (D. Del.). The complaint asserts violations of sections 14(a) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act, breach of fiduciary duty, unjust enrichment, and waste of corporate assets. The complaint names certain current and former officers and directors as defendants. It seeks, among other things, unspecified damages and an order requiring Clover to take certain actions to improve Clover’s corporate governance and internal procedures. The fifth action was filed in the Supreme Court of the State of New York and is captioned Sankaranarayanan v. Palihapitiya, et al., Index No. 655420/2021 (N.Y. Sup. Ct.). The complaint asserts breach of fiduciary duty and unjust enrichment. The complaint names certain former officers and directors as defendants.

On May 10, 2021, the Middle District of Tennessee shareholder derivative actions described above were consolidated under Sun v. Garipalli, et al., Case No. 3:21-cv-00311 (M.D. Tenn.) as lead case. The court designated co-lead counsel and liaison counsel and ordered the parties to submit a proposed schedule for the initial stage of the case. In June 2021, the parties in the Sun and Furman actions submitted joint stipulations and proposed orders to stay both actions. Soon thereafter, the courts in both actions approved the stipulations, thereby staying all proceedings and deadlines in the Sun and Furman actions pending a final decision on a motion to dismiss in the Middle District of Tennessee class actions consolidated under the Bond action. On September 16, 2021, the two District of Delaware derivative actions were consolidated under In re Clover Health Investments, Corp. Derivative Litigation, Case No. 1:21-cv-00191-LPS (Consolidated). The Furman complaint was deemed the operative complaint. All proceedings and deadlines in that matter are also stayed pending a final decision on a motion to dismiss in the Bond Action.
All of these cases remain in the preliminary stages. Given the inherent uncertainty of litigation and the legal standards that must be met, including class certification and success on the merits, the Corporation has determined that it is not probable or estimable that an unfavorable outcome or potential loss will occur. Clover intends to vigorously defend itself against the claims asserted against it.
Guaranty Assessments
Under state guaranty assessment laws, including those related to state cooperative failures in the industry, the Corporation may be assessed, up to prescribed limits, for certain obligations to the policyholders and claimants of insolvent insurance companies that write the same line or lines of business as the Corporation.


19. Direct Contracting

In April 2021, the Corporation began participating in the DC Model, which utilizes a structured model intended to reduce expenditures and preserve or enhance quality of care for beneficiaries in Medicare FFS. As a participating entity in the DC Model with a global risk arrangement, the Corporation assumes the responsibility of guaranteeing the performance of its care network. The DC Model is intended to reduce the administrative burden, support a focus on complex, chronically ill patients, and encourage physician organizations that have not typically participated in Medicare FFS to serve beneficiaries in Medicare FFS.

Key components of the financial agreement for Direct Contracting include:

Performance Year Benchmark The target amount for Medicare expenditures on covered items and services (Medicare Part A and B) furnished to a DCE’s aligned beneficiaries during a performance year. The Performance Year Benchmark will be compared to the DCE’s performance year expenditures. This comparison will be used to calculate shared savings and shared losses. The Performance Year Benchmark is established at the beginning of the performance year utilizing prospective trend estimates and is subject to retrospective trend adjustments, if warranted, before the Financial Reconciliation.

Performance Year A calendar year except for the commencement year, which began on April 1, 2021, and will end on December 31, 2021.

Risk-Sharing Arrangements Used in determining the percent of savings and losses that DCEs are eligible to receive as shared savings or may be required to repay as shared losses.

Financial Reconciliation The process by which CMS determines shared savings or shared losses by comparing the calculated total benchmark expenditure for a given DCE’s aligned population to the actual expenditures of that DCE’s aligned beneficiaries over the course of a performance year that includes various risk-mitigation options such as stop-loss reinsurance and risk corridors.

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Risk-Mitigation Options DCEs may elect a “stop-loss arrangement” each performance year, which is designed to reduce the financial uncertainty associated with high-cost expenditures of individual beneficiaries. The Corporation has elected participation in the program for the current performance year. Additionally, CMS has created a mandatory risk corridor program that allocates the DCE’s shared savings and losses in bands of percentage thresholds, after a deviation of greater than 25.0% of the Performance Year Benchmark.

Performance Guarantees

Certain of the Corporation’s arrangements with third-party providers require it to guarantee the performance of its care network to CMS, which if not obtained, could potentially result in payment to CMS during the financial reconciliation period. As a result of the DC agreement, the Corporation determined that there was a performance guarantee with the providers of DCE Beneficiaries that should be recognized in the financial statements. The Direct Contracting performance year obligation and receivable were initially measured as the target amount for Medicare expenditures on covered items and services. The obligation and receivable were subsequently amortized on a straight-line basis for the amount that represented the completed performance. The DCE is entitled to all of the consideration under the arrangement for all aligned beneficiaries and in the performance year in which the DCE is a participant, the final consideration due to the DCE by CMS (shared savings) or the consideration due to CMS by the DCE (shared loss) is reconciled in the subsequent years following the performance year. The shared savings or loss is measured periodically and will be applied to the Direct Contracting performance obligation if the Corporation is in a probable loss position. The Corporation is unable to estimate the maximum potential amount of future payments under the guarantee. This is attributable to the stop-loss arrangement and the corridors (tiered levels) in the arrangement. A certain percentage of these arrangements will still be the responsibility of the Corporation in addition to a number of variables that are not reasonable for the Corporation to estimate such as, but not limited to, risk ratings and benchmark trends that have an inestimable impact on the estimate of future payments.

The tables below include the financial statement impacts of the performance guarantee:

September 30, 2021
(in thousands)
Direct Contracting performance year receivable$220,738 
Direct Contracting performance year obligation (1)
244,599 
(1) This obligation represents the consideration due to providers, net of the shared savings or loss for the period and amortization of the liability.
Three Months Ended
September 30, 2021
Nine Months Ended
September 30, 2021
(in thousands)
Amortization of the Direct Contracting performance year receivable$(223,309)$(441,476)
Amortization of the Direct Contracting performance year obligation223,309 441,476 
Direct Contracting revenue222,647 439,020 


20. Operating Segments

The Corporation manages operations based on two reportable segments: Medicare Advantage and Direct Contracting. The reportable segments are distinguished based on the healthcare delivery business model. Its Medicare Advantage segment is an insurance business model that focuses on leveraging the Clover Assistant at the point of care. Its Direct Contracting segment is similar to a cost management and care coordination model accounted for as a performance guarantee, where Clover is responsible for coordinating care, managing costs, and providing support to providers and their DCE Beneficiaries through the use of Clover Assistant. These segment groupings are consistent with information used by the Chief Executive Officer, the Corporation’s chief operating decision maker, to assess performance and allocate resources. There are certain revenues and expenses that are attributable to clinical services and corporate overhead; these amounts are reported separately from reportable segments in the tables presenting segment results below.

The operations of the Corporation are organized into the following segments:

Medicare Advantage Segment includes operations related to our MA plans, which generally provide access to a wide network of primary care providers, specialists, and hospitals.

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Direct Contracting Segment includes our operations relating to CMS’s DC Model, which provides options aimed at reducing expenditures and preserving or enhancing quality of care for beneficiaries.

Corporate/Other includes other clinical services not included in Medicare Advantage and Direct Contracting and all other corporate overhead. Clinical services is comprised of Clover Home Care and other clinical services that are offered to eligible beneficiaries.

The table below summarizes the Corporation’s results by operating segment:

Medicare
Advantage
Direct ContractingCorporate/OtherEliminationsConsolidated Total
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021(in thousands)
Premiums earned, net (Net of ceded premiums of $120)
$203,657 $— $— $— $203,657 
Direct Contracting revenue— 222,647 — — 222,647 
Other income 80 — 24,967 (24,188)859 
Intersegment revenues — — 9,375 (9,375)— 
Net medical claims incurred208,661 228,060 2,253 (2,552)436,422 
Gross (loss) profit$(4,924)$(5,413)$32,089 $(31,011)$(9,259)
Total assets$347,535 $260,142 $887,089 $(542,288)$952,478 
Medicare
Advantage
Direct ContractingCorporate/OtherEliminationsConsolidated Total
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021(in thousands)
Premiums earned, net (Net of ceded premiums of $370)
$598,390 $— $— $— $598,390 
Direct Contracting revenue— 439,020 — — 439,020 
Other income108 — 66,990 (64,548)2,550 
Intersegment revenues— — 33,130 (33,130)— 
Net medical claims incurred640,624 469,972 5,273 (6,494)1,109,375